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20121027
20121104
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get the sense in reading your work over the years that you are saying technology humanizes classrooms. if i am right about that, tell me why you believe that. >> when people talk about technology or virtual anything, they always imagine that somehow replacing a physical -- like amazon.com versus barnes and vulcans orlike the balkan tyhe borg in star trek. we are seeing in classrooms that technology is not used to demonize the classroom, but to go the other way. we are all sitting there physically with each other but not interacting. we are staring at the chalkboard and one person is lecturing. one student might be bored and one might be lost. the teacher is not getting a lot of feedback. we are saying let's use technology to take some of that off the teachers table so is not about eight lector anymore. it should be about interacting with your friends and the teacher and doing problem- solving. when i was in school, if a friend is having trouble with something and you whispered, you should look at it this way, you should -- you would get reprimanded. why are you talking? they should be
to affect major changes. >> what good reason is there for not embracing the best of what digital technology offers? i understand people get set in their ways, but we are talking about saving lives and cutting costs. i cannot imagine what the push by would be. the fax i get frustrated because i have seen what happens. -- >> i get frustrated because i have seen what happens. i said, how am i going to get this into reality? basically this is an appeal to consumers, to the public. what we need is this gutenberg moment in medicine. now people can read, because this is on your phone, and there is no reason why most people who can easily get up to speed will drive and no medicine. there are not enough physicians, and the establishment is too rigid to except these profound changes. >> as the patient have any role, any agency he or she can use to drive the future of medicine? tracks let's say you have high blood pressure, which almost 70 million americans have. you can track that better than ever before. it all you have to do is press start, and you are taking charge of an important diagnostic, and
. is there is a growing fear print technology is dying out all together. as always with great change comes great opportunity. digital technology has the capacity to bring new forms of reading and new modes of publication. but to understand what the future of the book might look like t helps to appreciate some of its past. >> the manuscript library was built in 1963. its white all was ter shell has no windows this is to protect the treasures within. we're joined by david who is currently writing his own history of the book. >> books aren't going away. i mean i think and the question is what role they will play seems to me its thing that is hard toast predict. one of the things that is really remarkable is as europe made the transition from world dominated by manuscript and manuscript proud the text that were bound into books, and by the end of the 15th century the print technology takes root. you find lots of people saying oh this print technology, it's very interesting. it's very efficient but everyone has access to everything, there are no controls. one doesn't really know if this thing has any
percent. energy falling 1.7%. and technology down 1.5% falling commodity prices weighed on some of their respective stock sectors. oil fell more than two dollars per barrel, settling at its lowest price since june. the u.s. dollar was higher on the back of the employment numbers and a more expensive dollar can put downward pressure on oil. oil giant chevron also hurt the energy sector and the dow. chevron had the biggest percentage loss among dow stocks. chevron did not make as much money has anticipated in the third quarter. earnings per share were well short of estimates. similar to exxon mobil, chevron also saw its production and fuel sales fall, hit by hurricane isaac in augt, legal troubles in bra al and a refinery fire in california. b shares fell 2.8%, closing at their lowest price since july. two bright spots for chevron were its smaller refineries processing cheaper oil from montana and north dakota. meantime, chesapeake energy fell to a three month low, down 7.9%. the company has been trying to reduce its massive debt load. today the company said it may delay cutting i
. but this election is different. today digital technology has given campaigns the ability to take that data and target voters with a precision never before possible. says aristotle ceo john phillips. >> we've been targeting voters for a long time, campaigns have been. what's different about it now? >> a couple of things that have changed. 2012 is a watershed year. what's changed is that the campaigns have found that by using powerful computers and sophisticated software that they are able to quickly sift through these mountains of data and slice and dice the electorate to break down that mass of voters to just the people you want to reach and talk to them about something that is relevant. the magic of the big data is the one-to-one targeting. >> reporter: how is the targeting a guy like me? i'm a ridgesterred independent in a battle ground state. >> it starts with the registered voter. the d.n.a. of the electorate. >> reporter: your name, address, gender, race. that's all in the registered voter file. it's available to the campaign. >> now on top of the registered voter file, there might be
sector still like technology which has been hit here lately. tollers which is certainly hit here i think people are discounting maybe even more of a slowdown in china. and perhaps even more of a slowdown if that's possible in europe. so i think our analysis says you know, we-- chinese economic activity, possibly bottomed out here in the 7, 8% range. fanned we get a little bit of a surprise to the upside there or if europe is less bad or maybe even flattens out at some point in 2013, i think a sector like materials would do well, so we want to be not overweight the defensives. we want to play continued economic recovery. >> tom: looking for growth there, rob, how about it, is it on your buy list as well? >> you know, i'm not so sure i like overweighting technology at this point. it has come a long way. and i think it might take a little bit of a breather. consumer discretionaries i think should hold up pretty well. materials, i like it i would actually for the first time in many years put a toe in the water in financial. i think you might see a little overperformance there, after the dram
positive, much more constructionive. technology which had been a laggard, nasdaq, certainly knows this where you are at tonight t was one of the leaders today with the broad-based rally. let's get everybody updated with our market focus today. a new month, and new buying today with a broad-based stock gains. buyers got out early, with the s&p 500 jumping from the opening bell on the back of optimism ahead of tomorrow's employment report. the gains held through the session with the index finishing up by 1%. trading volume today was 793 li lhami sonons bre the million shares on the big board; just under 1.9 billion on the nasdaq. the materials sector led the way higher, up 2%. the technology and industrials sectors came next, gaining 1.8% each today. u.s. steel was the top materials stock, building its rally thanks to a surprise profit in its latest quarter. shares jumped 5.7%, even though the company forecasts break-even resu it's expecting to see lower prices and lower shipments for some types of steel. two other material companies-- gold miners barrick gold and newmont. barrick
similar to crowell in describing his groups use of technology. he also echoed others about the voters themselves. >> they're very independent minded. they are hard-working, working class citizens that vote for the person. they think the person is the best-- the person that most exemplifies who they are and will do the best job for them. so i think what you see here in green bay is a microcosm of what you see all across this state, the people want a new direction. >> reporter: given recent shifts here, though, the question in wisconsin remains: which really is the new direction? one prominent local citizen isn't tipping his hand. we met green bay mayor jim schmitt at a.l.s. hamburger shop. i noticed you're not endorsing either candidate. why's that? >> no. you what... what? look, i'm the mayor. i know who i want to be mayor, but when it comes to... >> reporter: you feel good about that one! >> i feel pretty good about that endorsement. >> reporter: mayor schmitt may be the smartest politician around. with a constituency fiercely divided and independent, he directed us to his own house
in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside tsnomorrow, starts today. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the giant hybrid storm named sandy left a growing toll today. officials reported at least 39 people killed, and $20 billion or more in damage. the nation's most populous city and its surroundings were at the epicenter. new york is a city in shock today, even deserted in places after a night of fear, fire and floods. a record storm surge of 13 feet poured into parts of lower manhattan, brooklyn, and queens as sandy hit. the rush of water closed major commu
, and lucasfilm's portfolio of entertainment technology patents. "star wars: episode 7" is expected to be released in 2015. >> tom: while the u.s. presidential race was already too close to call, now the candidates and election supervisors in the northeast have the aftermath of hurricane sandy to deal with. darren gersh looks at the potential impact on a key swing states. >> reporter: fears that super-storm sandy would disrupt voting and the presidential election are receding as the storm heads north and away from the united states. the storm hit new jersey hard, but the state makes it easy to vote early by mail, and that makes it unlikely the storm will keep many from sending in their ballots. new york does not offer early voting, giving officials there time to recover by election day. in the key swing state of virginia, election offices in 55 counties were up and running today. just nine remain closed and those are expected to reopen soon. the virginia secretary of state has asked local election officials to extend absentee voting hours through saturday. sandy has not disrupted early voting in o
factories. >> to find cleaner, more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe, the people of boeing are working together to build a belter tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. additional funding is also provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. it's about 8:00 p.m. eastern time two fridays before the election and according to the app on my iphone, we have 10 days, 23 hours, 15 minutes and 53 seconds before the polls close. accord dog every one of what seems like a thousand polls taken this week, this thing say true dead heat. so what are the candidates up to? they are releasing new ads every day. it's said that character is what we do when no one is looking. mitt romney thought no one was looking when he attacked 47% of americans. his company shipped jobs overseas. >> higher deficits, chronic unemployment, a president who admits he can't work with co
of "advances in science and technology.". and representative todd akin's infamous remark about women's bodies shutting down to prevent pregnancy in cases of so-called "legitimate rape." >> so doctor, are these extreme remarks by republicans distancing themselves from these remarks, are they what are keeping abortion front and center? >> they are actions. they remind women of people trying to redefine rain rape. the words are bad enough. the actions are worse. >> i disagree, bonnie. i think it's to the less advantaged to keep this conversation going. most of them are concerned about the state of the economy and jobs and that's what they are going to the whole thinking about. >> what we know is abortion is the leading topic for women. 39% to 19% to the economy. with the electorate being 56% women, swing voters being a key women demographic, the candidates and the campaigns need to address the issue and have to be in front of it. that's why they are trying to make it an issue. >> i laugh because murdoch's comment along with todd akin, it's men bation the dumb remarks and not representative of th
, or clothing, or medicine that fights cancer? with our tree cell technology, we think it can. weyerhaeuser, growing ideas. >> we are going to die. we have 90-year-old people. >> this week on "inside washington," sandy's birdknoll october surprise. >> i want to thank the president personally. >> how many votes are these pictures worth? >> we have heavy hearts with the suffering going on in a major part of our country. >> how do you compete with a natural disaster? climate change? neither candidate wants to go near it. the new unemployment number -- how will it play in the polling place? the jeep jobs in china flap. >> obama sold chrysler to italians who are going to build jeeps in china. >> it is an outrageous lie. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we thought this was going to be a pre-election broadcast and all we had to do was handicap the election. along came hurricane sandy. in politics, a wise man told me once that you can never see around the corner. i don't want to minimize the tragic human dimensions of this storm and its aftermath, but this is a p
to assess the data that is coming in. >> yeah, and you see this everywhere from sports to technology, to every other field, and people often make mistakes, we aren't used to having this much information at our disposal so we tend to get enamored by all of the noise sometimes, it is easier to staley trust the one poll, because in will tell me the truth when, in reality, one poll is really noise city, and when you put them together you actually get some predictability there. >> so if my father was here listening, my late father was listening to me talk to you he would say, okay, what did you predict for the world series? >> well, i am a detroit tigers fan. >> rose: so? >> so i didn't try to make an objective prediction, sports, baseball, tigers, i allowed the bias to color my prediction. >> rose: with the bias. >> yes, yes, yes, that was disappointing, absolutely. >> rose: and four games, it must have made it worse. >> yes, they wilt add built under the pressure there, i think. >> rose: or they had good pitching on the other side. >> well, it is a well constructed team but if you look
that we see and how much of it is what is talked about it as structural issues, changing technology, globalization, a kind of new normal that we've heard about from many people? >> well -- >> i think-- hold on, let me go with austan goolsbee here first. >> okay. >> okay, so two parts of the how much of the unemployment rate is coming from structural, i think not that high. i do think that is the thing that the economy is going to have to do. the fundamental reason why this recession looks a lot like the 2001 recovery and not the 1983 recovery is we can't go back to doing what we were doing before the recession began. just as in 2001 a bubble popped and then you're trying to shift what the economy is doing. so there is some element of that. but we also have got a significant component as i say of the whole world has slowed down. the u.s. growth rate while not fast enough is faster than the rest of the advanced world. so we've got to find a way to get ourselves boosted up where we're not getting any support from being able to increase our exports to other countries when that is exactl
i think with modern technology, we know about these hurricanes, four or five, six, seven days in advance, right. so there's this build up, this anticipatory anxiety. it's coming in six days, five days, four days. and you get to emergency mode. now in evolution, emergency mode is a great thing. your cortisol goes up, your adrenaline goes up. if there's a tiger there a million years ago off you go and you run away and you either live or you die, right. but that whole emergency mode lasts a couple minutes. we are not used to being in emergency mode for four, five, six days. when that happens, it just doesn't feel good. pit of the stomach, anxiety. >> rose: what can you do about that. >> there are three things is to create panic. one of them is danger. people sense danger. two is a feeling of being trapped. and i know i had a friend of mine that day of the hurricane hit when she said boy she was okay until she heard that the subways were closed. she got a feeling in the pit of her stomach and she popped a pill to relax you and she just felt anxious. and the third thing is bad inf
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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